Acquisition of Sociolinguistic Knowledge in a Mandarin-English Dual Immersion School

Get EBOOK

Do you know that you can save money by getting the book Acquisition of Sociolinguistic Knowledge in a Mandarin-English Dual Immersion School by Rebecca Lurie Starr in pdf version instead of buying one? We have the pdf version of the book Orphans of Islam available for free. Just click on red download button below to download Acquisition of Sociolinguistic Knowledge in a Mandarin-English Dual Immersion School by Rebecca Lurie Starr for free.

As children acquire language and encounter new speakers and linguistic situations, they also acquire the knowledge of sociolinguistic variation necessary to achieve communicative competence (Romaine 1984). When children enter school, they encounter new speakers, a new set of linguistic situations and styles, and sometimes new language varieties or even entirely new languages. Children's exposure to new languages is particularly intense in language immersion models; in the dual-language immersion model, students dominant in different languages interact in the same classroom, and spend time learning in each language. The "dual" in dual-language simplifies the more complex reality of many such programs, in which multiple varieties of languages are in fact present (Rubinstein-Avila 2002). In dual-language immersion classrooms where teachers and students speak a range of dialects, participants must learn to negotiate between varieties as well as between languages. The present study seeks to investigate what sociolinguistic knowledge children can acquire in the early elementary school years of a Mandarin-English dual-language immersion program, by examining how sociolinguistic meaning is reflected and negotiated in the linguistic practice and metalinguistic discourse of members of the school community. This question is addressed through ethnographic and quantitative analysis of teacher and student language use, corrective feedback, and other metalinguistic discourse. The present research draws on data from a year-long participant-observation study of first-grade and second-grade classes (ages 5-8) at a Mandarin-English dual-language immersion program in the United States. Analysis of language use and metalinguistic discourse at the school establishes that, rather than simply imitating the speech of their teachers or classmates, students in the early elementary grades can make use of sociolinguistic information present in stylistic variation and metalinguistic discourse to target and acquire a variety distinct from that used by the speakers around them. This analysis of the variation present in a dual-language immersion school setting also suggests that the sociolinguistic information present in classrooms is more rich and varied than has been previously assumed, and equips students to competently navigate a range of linguistic situations.

Related Books: